Tree extended over grass

3 Essential Tools for Tree Health

  1. SQ3QTR Square Pattern Nozzle

    This pressure-compensated low-volume spray nozzle is ideal for irrigation around trees or shrubs. Precise and efficient, it offers a unique edge-to-edge pattern with an adjustable radius from 2.5’ to 4.0’ to accommodate growth.

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  2. Root Watering System

    Root Watering Systems ensure your trees are set up to thrive from the start. Subsurface root aeration and irrigation minimizes run-off and evaporation while ensuring deep and broad root growth.

    Learn More
  3. XFS-CV Dripline

    Dripline is a versatile and flexible tree irrigation solution that can be extended as the tree grows. XFS-CV is ideal for subsurface installation around trees with a pure copper chip inside every emitter that provides the industry’s most effective root intrusion protection.

    Learn More
Episode Four

The Fremont Cottonwood

Elliott rides into Skull Valley, Arizona in search of the largest Fremont Cottonwood in the United States.

Cottonwood

Cottonwood tree

TREE FACTS

FREMONT COTTONWOOD

Tyler Hill
ISA Certified Arborist UT-4431A

Fremont Cottonwood
Populus Fremontii

It’s said that Native Americans would eat the inner bark of the Fremont cottonwood to prevent or cure scurvy. The bark and leaves were also combined to relieve swelling, treat cuts, or help with headaches and even saddle sores. When I think of an old western movie, it’s easy to picture the Fremont cottonwood in that rustic country town where the Populus fremontii is a native species. You’d find it along low elevation stream channels that are constantly wet or moist. And all those fence posts you might see in that old western movie probably also came from this tree.

Today, the Fremont cottonwood is used along banks of water for protection, wildlife food as well as shelter and shade for the livestock and facilities. It’s also very good for a windbreak or a big shade tree in the back of your property.

A fast grower, the Fremont cottonwood can live over 100 years and can reproduce easily from cuttings. The tree has a USDA zone of 3-8 and can handle moist but well-drained soils. This tree will show off its mass through a trunk with a large circumference and a total height reaching more than 100 feet tall.

If the Fremont cottonwood is used in landscapes for ornamental purposes, know that the roots can be aggressive with structures and pipes. Remember where its natural habitat comes from on the banks of the rivers enjoying all that water, so give this tree room to grow and show off its broad crown. If you’re thinking of adding a Fremont cottonwood in your area, reach out to your local certified arborist to see if it is a good fit. And always, take care of the trees as they take care of us.

Episode Three

The Moreton Bay Fig

Elliott heads to San Diego’s Balboa Park in search of an iconic tree that holds great meaning for generations of families.

Fig Tree

Fig Tree

TREE FACTS

MORETON BAY FIG

Tyler Hill
ISA Certified Arborist UT-4431A

Moreton Bay Fig
Ficus Macrophylla

The fig is an evergreen, and one of the fascinating things about this tree is that it can start as an epiphyte. An epiphyte is a seedling that can germinate up in the canopy of the tree until its roots can touch and establish contact with the soil, eventually becoming a freestanding tree.

The Ficus macrophylla is well known for its large buttress roots and very extensive surface root system. A fig’s roots are usually underground and therefore not easily visible, yet the Moreton Bay’s roots are very exposed. Roots anchor the plant, hold it upright, absorb water and minerals from the soil, and also store large quantities of plant food. These few functions are essential to all roots of trees and plants. The internal structure of a root is much like that of a stem or branch, having phloem, a cambium layer, and xylem. The phloem carries manufactured food down from the leaves to the root for food and storage whereas the xylem carries water and minerals up through the roots to the stems or branches.

This tree is native to eastern Australia from the north coast of Queensland to the south of New South Wales and also grows in a USDA zone of 9-11. So, if you’re thinking you would like this tree, please make sure your climate is the right and there is plenty of room for it to grow (usually in an open, public space).

Because its large root system can damage pipes and hardscape surfaces, the fig is not a good tree for a residential garden or home planting. It needs room to grow and flourish in a more tropical area, with bright light in indirect sunshine that’s free from frost. The more sunlight the fig gets, the larger the leaves will grow and the more fruit it will bear. The Ficus macrophylla also has a hard time recovering from overwatering and it can tolerate drought. But if high humidity is present, it may need watering to not disturb or hurt the roots. Remember that watering the fig should be related to the amount of soil moisture available, which implies any time the soil becomes somewhat dry.

Episode Two

Monterey Cypress

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Tree style facts 1

Tree style facts 2

TREE FACTS

MONTEREY CYPRESS

Tyler Hill
ISA Certified Arborist UT-4431A

Monterey Cypress
Cupressus macrocarpa

UNLESS someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. Its not. – The Lorax

The Monterey Cypress is a coniferous (evergreen) tree that is found in the genus Cupressus of the Cupressaceas (Cypress) family. A true Cypress, the leaves are scale-like and produced in a loose, circular spray around the shoot. This cypress produces cones that are composed of six to eight scales. This tree has become an iconic tree of the California coast and exposed coasts of Europe, with an incredible ability to withstand the exposure to the salty winds. The Monterey Cypress can reach heights of 80 to even 130 feet tall if in a prime location, but individual trees are often stunted by the extreme costal conditions. I think Dr. Seuss identified this tree in a great unique way. Young trees are symmetrical and almost with a shrub like look to them, with age the “Truffula” Monterey Cypress tree grows and displays a dense crown or as he said a tuft at the top.

The Monterey Cypress grows in USDA zones 8-10, and will not withstand frost. Likes the humid atmosphere. This Cypress likes the sun and easily grows in most soil types that are well drained. Water needs are low to average, is a great tree for a windbreaker or screen, low maintenance and little to no pruning is required.

“And I first saw the trees! The Truffula trees! The bright-colored tufts of the Truffula trees! Mile after mile in the fresh morning breeze.” Dr. Seuss The Monterey Cypress is a fun and very unique tree formed from the wind and elements around. Let us all be like the Lorax, speak for the trees!

Episode One

GIANT ALLIGATOR JUNIPER

 

Join Elliott in Prescott, Arizona as he discovers the emotional story of a tree believed to be more than 1,000 years old.

Tree style facts 1

Tree style facts 2

TREE FACTS

GIANT ALLIGATOR JUNIPER

Tyler HillI
SA Certified Arborist UT-4431A

Alligator Juniper
Juniperus deppeana

Junipers are coniferous (evergreen) trees and shrubs that are found in the genus Juniperus of the cypress family, Cupressaceae. They have scale-like leaves, and the fruit consists of a cone in which the scales have fused together to give a berry-like appearance. The common juniper is probably found in more regions of the world than any other tree. The Alligator juniper is found in the southwest region of the United States.

Deep bark squares up to 5 cm in a pattern on the Alligator juniper are distinctive, making it look just like an alligator’s back. The bark is up to 10 cm thick! Tree bark is just like the skin on humans, it protects all the important organs and holds the tree together. While the thick bark acts as defense mechanisms for things such as fire and harsh environments, this particular tree had some extra help from now parted friends! (Thank You.)

This juniper is very hard to date because of its growth pattern, meaning it is in no hurry. It will actually stop growing when there is not adequate water or moisture, but will begin to grow again as moisture is present. For this reason the tree can survive and grow in harsh conditions. It is said that this tree is anywhere from 500 to 1000 years old. (Maybe more!) Alligator junipers are one of the largest junipers in the southwestern United States growing upwards of 50 ft.

The juniperus deppeana likes the sun and prefers sandy, well-drained soils. When well-drained, it is very adaptable to a wide variety of soils. The Alligator juniper is a drought tolerant plant, known for its low water use. While it does not like the cold (USDA zone 7-9), it will tolerate it for a short time.